Posted by: ctbtonewsroom | July 9, 2018

The Importance of Creating Gender-Equitable Space in the Field of Nuclear Policy

In this article by Sylvia Mishra, a CTBTO Youth Group member and a Herbert Scoville Jr. Fellow working with NTI’s Global Nuclear Policy Programme, talks about the significance of creating gender equality in the fields of nuclear policy, non-proliferation, disarmament and other related topics.

“In January 2018, the UN achieved a major milestone when it became clear that 23 out of the 44 most senior positions, excluding the UN Secretary General, were held by women.”

Even though this gender balance in senior positions at the UN is of significance for organizations working on global parity, it’s also relevant to mention that, for instance, at the Nuclear Non-proliferation Treaty (NTP) Review Conference in 2015, the 73.5% of registered diplomats were men and just 26.5% were women.

It is also important to note that does not suffice to increase the number of women’s voices on nuclear policy matters, but also to empower those voices. As Ambassador Susan Burk recently noted, “One of the biggest challenges women face working on hard security issues has been building a reputation as a serious and credible expert and strategic thinker on issues that historically have been the purview of men.”

Sylvia Misrha also suggests in her article that one of the best ways to address this issue is to promote women into leadership positions, and also to make sure that the next generation is fully equipped to understand complex nuclear issues.
“As someone who has worked in India and the United States, I have come to realize that there are entrenched gender biases in almost all societies. However, I believe there is a growing recognition that in 2018, there is no place for orthodox views on ‘masculinity and strength’ in arms control” Mishra comments at the end of her article.

Read the full article here.

 

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